Apple Computers

The New, Revolutionary Apple Computers

Similar to a PC computer, an Apple computer is a computer that is built around a microprocessor and includes an operating system, software, and both built-in and external peripherals or input/output devices. An Apple computer may refer to a desktop computer or laptop, tablet, or handheld Apple device. Three decades ago, the Apple desktop computer was marketed as the Mac or Macintosh which was officially released to the public in 1984. These Mac computers were targeted for home, educational, or creative professional use. The distinction between the Apple desktop computer and the PC goes back nearly 30 years, to the mid-1980s, when the two main desktop computer competitors were IBM and Apple. Thus, the Apple computer was a direct contrast to a PC computer, since the Apple computer was not Intel-compatible. In fact, the Apple computer used to use a Motorola microprocessor.

In the early 1990s, due to being at a competitive disadvantage against Intel-based computers or PCs, Apple switched to an integrated all-in-one computer: the iMac. This strategic move was a sales success, and Apple's brand once again became a power-player in the world of desktop computers. Until recently, Apple computers exclusively used hardware and operating systems facilitated and developed by Apple. Apple desktop computers exclusively use the operating system Mac OS, which was introduced in 1984. This operating system, unlike PCs, is devoid of a command line. Historically, Apple computers simply could not boot with a different operating system because the processor was so closely tied to the software. However, in 2006 when Apple discontinued the PowerPC microprocessors and switched to Intel-based processors, it became possible to boot operating systems other than Mac OS.

Apple Computers

Apple computers have historically and still remain the leaders in creative professional software, especially when it comes to graphics and audio development. This trend will continue throughout the decade, largely due to Apple's integrated GPUs available on Intel-based Apple computers. A GPU is a graphics processing unit, and Apple's GPUs provide high-performance graphics support which share discrete video memory with the main system. The next generation of the Mac Pro 2013, the newest Apple desktop computer, will feature and be designed around a revolutionary thermal core. This thermal core will allow the hardware to share its entire thermal capacity, resulting in breakthrough performance. Another feature of the new Mac Pro 13 is Thunderbolt 2. Thunderbolt is a technology which supports display and data through a single port at ultra-fast speeds of 10Gbps in both directions, allowing for greater speeds, flexibility, and simplicity. This new Mac Pro is expected to go on sale in December of 2013 and fetch a price of $2,999.